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Top USA Bars with a View

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From JetSetter.com – Saving because I love to have cocktails with a view in the best places. And unbelievably I’ve never had a tipple in any of these so I defo need to start checking some off my list.  Do you have any good recs for me from your state? Do tell!

 

 

 

50 States of Cocktails: Where to Drink (With a View) Across America

Nothing has us pining more for a refreshing drink than the long, hot days of August. Thankfully, America is absolutely brimming with fabulous cocktail dens, hometown breweries, and rooftop bars where you can toast the season in style. From an open-air deck on a Delaware beach to a swanky loft in New Orleans, here are 50 spots (and 50 drinks) to try this summer in each state.

1 Maine: Portland Lobster Company

Winter can be downright brutal in coastal Maine, so when summer hits, locals spend as much time as possible outdoors. Where better to enjoy the sun and salty sea breezes than at a lobster shack? They’re ubiquitous up and down the coast but Portland Lobster Company, situated right on the water overlooking Casco Bay, might just be the best. Its alfresco picnic tables are perpetually crowded with Portlanders, who come to enjoy local craft beer (go for the Allagash White or Black, brewed right in town), live music, and some of tastiest lobster rolls in the state.

2 Pennsylvania: Assembly Rooftop at the Logan, Philadelphia

As far as views in Philly go, it doesn’t get much better than the Logan Philadelphia‘s Assembly Rooftop Lounge, whose terrace affords sweeping views of Logan Square, Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art with its famous staircase (any Rocky fans out there?). Grab a group of friends and cozy up on one of the semi-circular couches surrounding the fire pits for a drink or two. On warm days, cool down with the Celery Stalked—a refreshing combination of local Bluecoat barrel-aged gin, St. Germain, and celery and lime juice.

3 New Jersey: Rooftop at Exchange Place, Jersey City

Many New Yorkers would agree: in order to truly appreciate Manhattan’s skyline, you need to get out of the city. No place proves that point more than Jersey City’s new Rooftop at Exchange Place, where you can take in unbeatable panoramas that stretch from the Empire State Building all the way to the Statue of Liberty. We doubt anyone will judge you for snapping pics of the Skyliner (sparkling wine with crème de violette) held up against One World Trade Center’s silhouette.

4 Rhode Island: The Roof Deck at the Grace Vanderbilt, Newport

American businessman Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt commissioned the Grace Vanderbilt in 1909 as a mansion for his mistress. Now a boutique hotel, this property has some of the best views of Newport’s marina. Drink like a Gilded Age tycoon at the Roof Deck, where guests settle into Adirondack chairs with champagne cocktails in hand and watch the sun set over the water. New this summer: a crudo bar, which will serve oysters and seafood all season long.

5 Connecticut: Treehouse at the Oyster Club, Mystic

You might recognize Mystic from its starring role in the 1988 Julia Roberts film Mystic Pizza, but there’s lots to discover in this quintessential New England seaside town beyond its Hollywood roots—including the largest maritime museum in the United States. After exploring the quaint downtown, grab a seat on the string light-lit wooden deck at the Treehouse above the Oyster Club during daily happy hour (3 to 6 p.m.) to take advantage of $1 freshly shucked oysters alongside a signature Bloody Mary.

6 New York: The Ides Bar, Brooklyn

The Ides Bar at Williamsburg’s hip Wythe Hotel may not be New York’s newest rooftop bar, or even its highest, but it’s still one of the best places in New York to take in Manhattan’s storied skyline. As Williamsburg’s original boutique hotel, the Wythe’s got street cred in spades: the top floors (which were added onto the original cooperage) feature floor-to-ceiling glass windows that guarantee gorgeous views all year long, but Ides really comes alive in summer when it opens its outdoor terrace. Toast the end of the season with a Storm in the Summer, a house cocktail made with Reyka Vodka, raspberry brandy, bianco vermouth, and soda.

7 Vermont: Falcon Bar, Manchester

Talk about a piece of living history: the Equinox, a Luxury Collection Golf Resort & Spa has hosted no less than four U.S. presidents in its historic rooms and suites, and rumor has it Marsh Tavern (located in the original 1769 building) was a watering hole for revolutionaries during the Civil War. The place to savor a drink alfresco is the Falcon Bar, just off the main lobby, where (in addition to classic cocktails) you can sip local craft beer and over 50 varieties of wine and single-malt scotches. There’s even a fire pit for cooler nights.

8 New Hampshire: Cabonnay, Manchester

Opened last year in Manchester, Cabonnay (a blend between cabernet and chardonnay) occupies two spectacular spaces inside an otherwise unassuming office building: there’s the rooftop patio lined with flower boxes, umbrellas, and tables for two along with a ground-floor dining room whose menu of New England favorites with an Asian twist (tempura fried chicken; avocado toast with a soy poached egg) earned it a spot on New Hampshire Magazine’s Best New Restaurants list in 2017. You won’t go wrong with any of their wines.

9 Maryland: Pool Bar & Grill at the Sagamore Pendry Baltimore

The Sagamore Pendry Baltimore, which debuted earlier this year in the landmarked Recreation Pier in Fell’s Point, is drawing hip locals and out-of-towners to its innovative pool bar, shaped out of recycled shipping containers. After enjoying a refreshing Aperol Spritz and views of the real shipping frigates docked in Baltimore Harbor, order up something from the food menu (crab cakes; fish tacos), which is overseen by none other than New York-based chef Andrew Carmellini.

10 Massachusetts: Lookout Rooftop, Boston

The Lookout Rooftop & Bar at the Envoy, an Autograph Collection Hotel has been Boston’s hot spot for drinks with amazing waterfront views ever since it opened in 2015, but a recent $4 million expansion has made it even better. We’re talking 2,500 square feet more space and a plush seated section overlooking the Seaport District, where you can while away happy hours among the city’s stylish locals. House cocktails are the way to go; spring for their take on a Moscow Mule (made with Absolut Lime, lime juice, simple syrup, and ginger beer).

11 Delaware: Big Chill Beach Club, Bethany Beach

Delaware is all about its beach towns, and locals know that North Bethany Beach has some of the best venues to hang out at when the summer season hits. Our favorite: the wooden rooftop deck at the Big Chill Beach Club, which overlooks the Atlantic Ocean and the Indian River Bay and seats up to 200 people (so you rarely have to fight for a seat). Bring all your friends and order a Beach Bucket to share like the South Side Punch, made with Cruzan Passion Fruit rum, orange juice, pineapple, and grenadine.

12 Mississippi: The Coop, Oxford

You don’t have to be a University of Mississippi student to appreciate the Graduate Oxford, a funky hotel near campus that exudes southern charm. The place to be is The Coop, the property’s fourth-floor terrace lounge with a modern farmhouse vibe, for barrel-aged whiskey cocktails and Southern classics (including four excellent Moscow mule variations like the Kentucky, mixed with Four Roses bourbon).

13 West Virginia: Restaurant at the Glen Ferris Inn

For a taste of historic charm on the banks of the Kanawha River, it’s hard to beat the restaurant at the Glen Ferris Inn. Built in 1816, the inn was first conceived as a family residence for retired army colonel Aaron Stockton. Over time, the inn began to take on lodgers including presidents, governors, and the naturalist John James Audubon. Follow in their footsteps by sipping something classic—a gin and tonic, perhaps?—with views of Kanawha Falls.

14 South Carolina: The Rooftop at the Vendue, Charleston

For a bird’s-eye view of Charleston’s steepled skyline and the waterfront, take the elevator to the top-floor bar of The Vendue, a historic hotel in the city’s French Quarter. Downstairs, sparkling chandeliers and original wood beams recall the property’s 18th-century heritage; upstairs is far more modern—a two-tiered space of covered and uncovered wooden decks with fun pop art installations. Watch the sunset over a refreshing Southside Fizz, made with Seersucker Gin, lime juice, fresh mint, and club soda.

15 Kentucky: Belle’s Cocktail House, Lexington

When it comes to bourbon, all roads lead from Lexington, where world-famous distilleries Four Roses and Woodford Reserve are just a half-hour’s drive away. For something right in town, locals love Belle’s Cocktail House. Named for Belle Brezing (a real-life Victorian-era southern belle who ran a high-class brothel out of her mansion and was the inspiration for the fictional character Belle Watling in Gone With the Wind), this watering hole stocks more than a hundred varieties of Kentucky’s famous whiskey. The rooftop bar (Lexington’s first) is an added bonus—perfect for sipping an Old Fashioned on hot summer nights.

16 Florida: Sugar, Miami

Competition for the best outdoor bar is fierce in Miami, where over-the-top hotels like the Faena and creative cocktail dens like the Broken Shaker offer up ambiance in spades. This summer’s rooftop du jour is Sugar, a 40th-floor hangout at EAST, Miami where revelers dressed to the nines sip Asian-inflected drinks in a tropical oasis of Balinese-inspired décor and copious potted palms. Try the refreshing Toki Highball, made with Japanese Suntory Toki whiskey, yuzu, Lagavulin 16, and soda.

17 Georgia: Peregrin, Savannah

Savannah’s highly anticipated Perry Lane Hotel (a member of the Luxury Collection) has finally opened its doors, bringing a hot new rooftop bar to Georgia’s oldest city. Designed by award-winning firm AvroKO, the hotel embodies southern charm with a modern twist—and the rooftop, dubbed Peregrin, is no different. A lush oasis of jasmine blossoms and boxwood plants surround an inviting patio where both locals and visitors come to play lawn games and sip local craft beers, frozés, and signature drinks like the Perry Lane Special—made with cognac, dry curaçao, absinthe, sparkling wine, and lemon.

18 Tennessee: L.A. Jackson, Nashville

Instagram lovers will find everything their feed needs next at L.A. Jackson, the rooftop bar at the Thompson Nashville beloved as much for its panoramic views of downtown and the Gulch as it is for its ice cream sandwiches (of which there are three mouthwatering varieties—in addition to bar bites like catfish chips and venison poppers). The daiquiris are worth their salt, too. JS Tip: time your visit for a Monday night, when Jack White’s record label Third Man Records hosts DJ nights featuring local musicians and influencers that spin their favorite tunes.

19 North Carolina: The Roof at the Durham Hotel

Sleek midcentury vibes prevail at the Durham Hotel, a 53-room boutique hotel in a 1969 former bank building downtown. For alfresco cocktails, look no further than the hotel’s 3,000-square-foot roof deck, which includes an indoor bar with covered seating in addition to its open-air space. Wherever you choose to hold court, you can’t go wrong with the hotel’s namesake cocktail, which blends rum, cognac, port, Benedictine, and Angostura bitters.

20 Arkansas: The Preacher’s Son, Bentonville

Bentonville, Arkansas, is one of the best under-the-radar small cities in the United States, particularly when it comes to its art scene (you’ll find everything from Andy Warhol’s COCA-COLA to the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Bachman-Wilson House at its ground-breaking Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art). When it comes to drinks, there are some great places to imbibe, too. The Preacher’s Son, housed in a former Neo-gothic church, debuted a new rooftop patio last summer—a great place to enjoy a Rhubarb Cup (gin, Sfumato, strawberry-rhubarb syrup, lemon, and soda).

21 Louisiana: Hot Tin, New Orleans

If you’re not in the mood to deal with the masses on Bourbon Street, head for NOLA’s rooftops. A swanky evening out is guaranteed at Hot Tin, in the historic Pontchartrain Hotel, which was designed to look like a 1940s artist’s loft (Tennessee Williams reportedly lived on property when he wrote A Streetcar Named Desire). Spicy drinks dominate this summer’s menu; for something more low-key with just a little kick, try the Hibbity Dibbity—a bourbon-based cocktail mixed with blueberry hibiscus tea, lemon, and ginger.

22 Virginia: Q Rooftop Bar, Richmond

Since its opening in 2015, Richmond’s Quirk Hotel has been a magnet for creative types, who are drawn to its sleek design and the adjacent Quirk Gallery that exhibits work by established and emerging artists. You might even meet some of them at Q Rooftop Bar, where locals and visitors mingle over craft cocktails, wine, and beer. Grab a spot on one of the white couches or chairs and soak up the views of downtown that stretch all the way to the Richmond Coliseum.

23 Alabama: Carrigan’s Public House, Birmingham

Carrigan’s Public House occupies an industrial space in the heart of Birmingham with a cool rooftop deck that’s perfect for catching the breeze on hot summer nights. You’ll find a great selection of craft beer here, but they’re most known for their elevated cocktails. Try the Fightin’ Words, a unique take on an Old Fashioned with rye, Cocchi Americano, Fernet Branca, orange blossom water, Angostura bitters, and flamed orange.

24 Washington: Canon, Seattle

A line often extends out the door at Seattle’s tiny 32-seat bar, Canon. It’s little wonder why: the spot won an award at the 2017 Tales of the Cocktails celebration (often considered the industry’s Academy Awards) for housing one of the largest and rarest collections of spirits in the world. The interior looks like a library of sorts, with tall shelves extending up to the ceiling (and reached only by ladder). The Capitol Hill drinkery also has a fun summertime secret: a hidden patio. If you manage to nab a coveted outdoor seat, we recommend indulging in the refreshing Streamline, made with gin, strawberry juice, pineapple, and bitters.

25 Idaho: 315 Martinis and Tapas, Coeur d’Alene

Tucked away in the northern city of Coeur d’Alene is Idaho’s historic Greenbriar Inn, which opened in 1908. Its restaurant, 315 Martinis and Tapas, has the foremost cocktail program in town—and a patio and two porches for alfresco drinking. Order a Tuscan Pear (citrus vodka, ginger liqueur, pear juice, and orange bitters) then kick back, relax, and enjoy being outdoors.

26 Montana: Tiki Bar at the Lodge at Whitefish Lake

Nature reigns supreme in Montana, and during the summer at the Lodge at Whitefish Lake, you can drink lakeside at a tiki bar. (There’s a poolside space, too, if that’s more your scene.) The summertime hot spot is an extension of the Boat Club Lounge and Restaurant, which has been named one of the best happy hours in Whitefish. Try the Big Mountain Mojito for a refreshing tipple under the sun.

27 Oregon: Departure Restaurant and Lounge, Portland

Portland, Oregon, might have more of a reputation for its outdoorsy personality, but it has some seriously swanky drinking dens as well. You’ll find a bit of both at Departure, the Asian-inspired rooftop bar and restaurant inside the artsy-luxe Nines, a Luxury Collection Hotel. While the mountain and river views from the dining room are amazing, the vistas from its two patios are even better. Order the tequila-based (and easily Instagrammable) Madame Cheng: coconut ash colors the cocktail black, but guanabana and lemon verbena make it surprisingly fruity and fresh.

28 Wyoming: The Deck @ Piste, Jackson Hole

With a landscape as beautiful as Wyoming’s, you’re best off imbibing somewhere where you can take it all in. Though you might be more used to seeing white ski slopes in Jackson Hole, during the summer, you can take the gondola up to The Deck @ Piste, which has a beautiful patio overlooking the greenery. For a simple but tasty tipple, order the Huckleberry How Pow, made with huckleberry vodka (it’s the state fruit of neighboring Idaho), lemonade, and soda.

29 Alaska: Crow’s Nest, Anchorage

Most bars in Anchorage don’t have outdoor space (for a city whose summertime temperatures typically top out at 61˚F, we’re not surprised), but you can still get incredible 360-degree views of the mountains and the sea from the Crow’s Nest, Hotel Captain Cook’s rooftop bar and restaurant. Despite the name, you won’t find a tacky pirate theme here: the bar is sleek with warm woods that mimic the interior of an elegant ship, and the dress code is business casual. Order a classic Sidecar—it might not be the most summery of drinks, but it certainly feels like the right choice given the space.

30 Nevada: Mandarin Bar, Las Vegas

Las Vegas has no shortage of places to imbibe, but in our opinion, the best are the ones overlooking the Strip. The sophisticated Mandarin Bar on the Mandarin Oriental hotel’s 23rd floor offers a quieter, more luxe experience than other spots in Sin City, with floor-to-ceiling windows on three sides framing neon-lit views of the famous Vegas skyline. The five elements–inspired Wu Xing cocktail (mixed with Johnnie Walker Blue and baiju with flavors of lemongrass, ginger, lychee, oolong, and sandalwood) is new this year and makes for the perfect summer sip while enjoying the twinkling lights.

31 New Mexico: Bell Tower Bar, Santa Fe

Fun fact: the artsy town of Santa Fe, founded in 1610, is the oldest capital city in the U.S. Get a taste of history at La Fonda on the Plaza, the grand dame in town, whose site has hosted inns since 1609. Of all the margaritas on the menu (and there are a few of them) at the property’s seasonal Bell Tower Bar, located on the fifth floor, we’re partial to the Daizy—mixed with Cointreau, St. Germain, and a Patron tequila made just for the hotel.

32 California: Broken Shaker, Los Angeles

In downtown L.A., you’ll find this summer’s hottest scene at the Broken Shaker, the new Freehand Hotel’s loosely tiki-themed rooftop bar featuring a pool surrounded by pink loungers (note that swimming is for hotel guests only) and a vibrant atmosphere that transitions from day to night. The Funky Monkey—gin, Tempis Fugit crème de cacao, banana purée, and coconut cream—is the perfect boozy delight and packs quite the tropical punch.

33 Arizona: Jade Bar, Scottsdale

If it was good enough for Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s honeymoon, it’s good enough for us. The luxurious Sanctuary Camelback Mountain has one of the best views of all the hotels in Scottsdale, thanks to its location on the slopes of Camelback Mountain. Another romantic draw: the seriously swanky Jade Bar, which often has live music and maximizes those views with floor-to-ceiling windows that overlook the desert and Arizona’s magical sunsets. For a spicy, smoky riff on a margarita, try the State of the Union (made with pineapple-infused mezcal, Ancho Reyes Verde, a five-spice simple syrup, and lime).

34 Oklahoma: O Bar, Oklahoma City

The seventh-floor rooftop of the boutique Ambassador Hotel, an Autograph Collection property in downtown Oklahoma City, possesses one of the best views of the skyline. Though the indoor bar has great vistas itself, there’s a small outdoor area open in the summer, which is a great spot to sip an Airmail—a refreshingly sweet mix of rum, lime, honey, and sparkling wine.

35 Utah: Red Rocks Grill at Zion Lodge

As the only lodge located within the borders of Zion National Park, Zion Lodge is perfectly situated to soak in the beautiful views of its majestic rock formations. Head to the terrace at Red Rock Grill and order the Prickly Pear Margarita—an indigenous fruit to the area that’s just the right amount of sweet you can indulge in all day long.

36 Colorado: Corrida, Boulder

Right in the heart of downtown Boulder, the newly opened Corrida is a Spanish-inspired steakhouse with a killer cocktail menu and a great deck with mountain views. The restaurant serves a menu of gin and tonics in the Spanish style—that is, poured table-side. Our favorite is the herbal Sweet Citrus, made with Damrak & Fever Tree Mediterranean Tonic, orange, rosemary, and coriander.

37 Texas: Arlo Grey, Austin

The Line, Austin’s newly minted boutique hotel, is already one of the most popular spots to be at this season thanks to its fantastic pool scene and highly-anticipated restaurant by Top Chef winner Kristen Kish called Arlo Grey. The latter offers a great view onto the pool, so it’s a prime people-watching spot made all the better with a cocktail in hand. Try the Devil’s Backbone, a concoction of mezcal, pineapple, and lime that practically sings summer.

38 Hawaii: KOA Oasis Booze Shack, Honolulu

Beachfront bars lining the shores of Hawaii are a dime a dozen, but for a funky spot that drastically differs from Honolulu’s typically swanky hotel pool scenes, head to the KOA Oasis Booze Shack. It’s just a trailer parked along the Fort DeRussy Boardwalk (so don’t expect any frills), but it serves one of the best Mai Tais you’ll ever have. Grab one and take in the views of the water while you people-watch.

39 Wisconsin: Outsider Rooftop, Milwaukee

Indoor-outdoor living might be the norm in California, but in Wisconsin, it’s a rarity—unless you’re at The Outsider rooftop bar in Milwaukee, where you can get the best of both worlds. There are six different areas of the bar to choose from (including booths on the terrace warmed by fire pits) and many have retractable glass walls, making this a destination in any season. This summer, order a Toucan House Rules for a strong tropical tipple: it’s made of rum, gin, pineapple-infused Campari, orgeat, lime, pineapple, mint, and bitters.

40 Minnesota: Seven Steakhouse Sushi & Rooftop, Minneapolis

After a major overhaul last year, the Seven Steakhouse Sushi & Rooftop in downtown Minneapolis debuted not only all-new interiors—very sleek and modern ones, at that—but also a brand-new menu that makes even the most classic choices exciting (there’s champagne in the potato soup and sirloins are aged for 40 days, New York strip-style). As the venue name suggests, there are several components to this complex, but we recommend going straight to the massive Haven rooftop (which serves Asian-inspired bites as well as steaks) and ordering the Ginger on the Rye.

41 Illinois: Cindy’s, Chicago

Once home to a landmarked men’s-only private club, the Chicago Athletic Association received a gorgeous refurb courtesy of hit design firm Roman and Williams and its rooftop bar, Cindy’s, now consistently ranks among the city’s best bars. The vaulted glass-and-steel atrium reminiscent of a Beaux Arts train station keeps the space bright and airy, while an open-air terrace offers panoramic views of Millennium Park, the Art Institute of Chicago, and Lake Michigan. Ask a bartender to shake up one of their creative concoctions like the Grey Garden (made with Tito’s, Dolin Blanc, crème de violette, jasmine tea, and lemon).

42 Indiana: Rooftop Garden Cocktail Lounge, Indianapolis

Indianapolis’s food scene has been heating up over the last few years and gaining lots of acclaim. If you’re headed there this summer, discover one of the city’s most unique attractions at the historic Fountain Square Theater Building, where you can savor excellent cocktails and pizza with panoramic downtown views at the new Rooftop Garden Cocktail Lounge. Try one of their Moscow Mule variations like the Gin Gin Mule, made with Tanqueray, ginger beer, mint, and lime.

43 Iowa: UP Skybar, Davenport

Situated just a few blocks from the banks of the Mississippi River, the Current Iowa, an Autograph Collection Hotel, boasts one of the best rooftop bars in Davenport. The appropriately named UP Skybar features lounge-style seating with sofas and chairs surrounding fire pits. Sip on a “Summers Are For Shandies” cocktail, which blends sweet tea vodka with lemon juice and Old Davenport Gold blonde ale from the local Front Street Brewery.

44 Missouri: Element, St. Louis

For a small city, St. Louis has a surprising number of rooftop bars. Our current favorite is the third-floor terrace of Element St. Louis, a casual fine-dining restaurant serving up American cuisine inside a former power plant. The outdoor space offers more than views; you can also enjoy live music on Friday nights during the summer. If you’re looking for a perfectly fruity-but-not-too-sweet cocktail, consider the Collinsville, which is mixed with gin, aloe, grapefruit, lemon, and simple syrup.

45 Nebraska: 1912 Benson, Omaha

Nebraska might be considered a flyover state, but Omaha is well worth a stop, especially for its food and drinks. In the summer, do yourself a favor and head to the rooftop of 1912 Benson in the historic district of Benson—one of the city’s hippest neighborhoods. While the restaurant might be best known for its delicious food (get the poutine), we’re partial to its cocktails, especially the Benson Mule with its mouthwatering ginger and pineapple combination.

46 South Dakota: Vertex Sky Bar, Rapid City

At the nexus of Mount Rushmore, the Black Hills, and the Badlands, Rapid City has a flourishing food and drink scene that’s putting South Dakota on the map. For the best views in town, head to the Art Deco-style Hotel Alex Johnson, which is home to the luxurious Vertex Sky Bar. Though you can imbibe and take in the views from indoors year-round, the atmosphere is best in the summer, when the terrace opens up. Order the Black-Berry Hills Smash—the bar’s riff on a Mint Julep featuring bourbon, simple syrup, blackberries, mint, lemon, and soda.

47 North Dakota: Luft Rooftop Beer Garden, Bismarck

When summer rolls around after a frigid winter, North Dakotans flock to outdoor bars to enjoy the much-missed rays of sun. In the capital, Bismarck, the Lüft Rooftop Beer Garden offers imbibers a greenhouse-themed space decorated with warm woods and quite a bit of greenery, with a roof that remains open in the warmer months so you can enjoy the fresh air. Embrace the summertime spirit with a Swipe Right, a rum-based drink mixed with lychee, lime, and mint.

48 Kansas: Public at the Brickyard, Wichita

You don’t need to score tickets to enjoy the tunes of Wichita’s largest outdoor music venue. Public at the Brickyard offers its own patio space, which is a great spot to listen to the music being played next-door. The bar and restaurant are dedicated to all things Kansas—bar bites incorporate ingredients sourced from local businesses like Yoder Meats and Creekstone Farms, while many of their craft beers are brewed right in Wichita—but when it comes to cocktails, we’re a fan of something a bit farther-flung: namely, the seasonal Verano, comprised of tequila, Grand Marnier, lime, pineapple, habañero, mango nectar, and a Tajin-spiced rim.

49 Ohio: Cocktail Terrace at 21c Museum Hotel Cincinnati

The pop-tails at 21c Museum Hotel Cincinnati’s Cocktail Terrace might be the summer’s most Instagrammable drinks, but the boozy slushies are a close second. This intimate rooftop bar clearly doesn’t take itself too seriously—just look to the yellow plastic penguins, the 21c brand’s mascot—which makes it the perfect place for day drinking with a group of friends.

50 Michigan: Lumen, Detroit

It’s no secret that Detroit is seeing an infusion of energy into its restaurant and bar scene. One of the coolest new spots to take it all in is Lumen, a 4,000-square-foot restaurant that’s also home to a green roof and a 45-seat rooftop patio. Grab one of the tables or have a seat around the fire pit and start off the evening right with one of their Michigan-brewed ales from Griffin Claw Brewing Co. (like the fruity Mr. Bluesky or El Ligero).

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architecture · arizona · art · travel · usa

Taliesin West ~ Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright is one of the biggest names in architecture. I had only seen pictures of his marvels, but when I was in Phoenix my Mom and I went to his winter residence (and school) – Taliesin West in Scottsdale, AZ. Of course he doesn’t live there anymore, Wright died in 1959, but it continues today as the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture, an accredited school. It was built and maintained entirely by Wright and his apprentices, making it the most personal of his creations.

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Taliesin is in Spring Green, WI and was his summer residence. He built it for his lover Mamah Borthwick, in part to shield her from aggressive reporters and the negative public sentiment surrounding their non-married status. Both had left their spouses and children in order to live together and were the subject of relentless public censure. In 1914, while Wright was working in Chicago a male servant hired from Barbados set fire and murdered seven people with an axe. One of those being Mamah and her two children. I could continue on but this post is not about Taliesin, it’s about Taliesin West.

With everything that Frank Lloyd Wright designed, he believed in designing structures that were in harmony with humanity and its environment, a philosophy he called organic architecture. Not to overtake but to become one with it. I love this idea.

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Wright and the Taliesin Fellowship (his apprentices) began to “trek” to Arizona each winter in 1933. In 1937 Wright purchased the plot of desert land that would soon become Taliesin West. He paid $3.50 an acre on a southern slope of the McDowell Range, believing this to be the perfect spot to build: a residence, a business, and a place to learn.

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Drafting Room at Taliesin West

I am in love with this red door of the drafting room.

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He wanted Taliesin West to connect with the desert, the structure’s walls are made of local desert rocks, stacked within wood forms and filled with concrete. Natural light was used as much as possible with windows but no glass, only an open space for birds to fly through and sunlight to beam its rays throughout the rooms. Light beige canvas was used for the roofing and could be rolled up or down depending on the day.

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For Wright everything he did was intentional. He was fascinated with the petroglyphs found on the Taliesin West property, the clasped hands of the American Indian symbol of friendship. This is often referred to as the running arrow; however, Mr. Wright preferred to call it the whirling arrow. Found in many places around the property but seen here on a rock and near the water fountain at Taliesin West.

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Wright enjoyed entertaining. Almost every Saturday he would invite people over for cocktails, dinner, maybe a movie or a dance production. They would start in the Garden Room, one of the most popular rooms at Taliesin West. Here you have a long bench but also Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous butterfly chairs.

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Every year upon his return to Taliesin West he would walk around with making changes and shouting orders to his apprentices. Taliesin West was a continuing project for Wright, always changing things with new ideas and improving the space with different concepts. Throughout the years he added to the dining room and one brilliant addition was the cabaret theatre with six-sides in an irregular hexagonal shape, it provides its occupants a “95% acoustic perfection”. Someone in the very back can hear even the slightest whisper from the stage.

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Piano space cut into stone in cabaret theatre

And speaking of the stage, his apprentices would learn more than just architecture. The Taliesin Fellowship were taught to learn all aspects of life, integrating not only architecture and construction, but also farming, gardening, and cooking, the study of nature, art, music, and dance. He would have parties almost every Saturday and half of his apprentices would cook and the other half would serve and clean up. Or if he wanted a special dance or music set for his guests, the apprentices would learn the dance or the song and perform.

I thoroughly enjoyed visiting Taliesin West and would recommend it to anyone, especially if you love architecture. There are many different types of tours, we did the Insight Tour which lasted about an hour and a half. Ticket prices are $34 for advanced purchase but if you are an Arizona resident you get 50% off, so don’t forget to mention that if you are! Enjoy and I would love to hear about your favorites of Frank Lloyd Wright.

Taliesin West. 12621 N Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd, Scottsdale, AZ. 480.627.5378

 

 

arizona · art · hotels · she's crafty · shopping · travel · usa

Ghost Town in Jerome ~AZ

I ain’t scared of no ghosts.

Jerome, AZ is touted as the “Largest Ghost Town in America”, as well as “America’s Most Vertical City”, sitting at more than 5,000 ft above sea level. It started as a copper mining camp and by the 1920s it was home to more than 10,000 people. Jerome’s personality has changed a lot from once a thriving mining camp between the late-1880s and early 1950s, the town is now a bustling tourist magnet and artistic community with a population of about 450. But its external appearances have remained much the same for the last 100 years.

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My parents and I decided to make a day of it. Jerome is about 100 miles north of Phoenix on state route 89A between Sedona and Prescott. Mom gave me the job of finding a cute place to stop on the way up for brunch. And I think I succeeded supremely. If you are looking for a super good place for breakfast or lunch food then try out Nora Jean’s coffee kitchen in Black Canyon City, AZ. I was extremely jealous of Mom’s patty melt with grilled veggies, Dad had a Reuben with homemade potato salad and I had a breakfast sandwich of egg and bacon on an English muffin. They had fresh, iced, green and peach tea, my newest favorite discovery of cold brew coffee and the lemon bars looked amazeballs.

Alright, bellies are full, we are decently caffeinated and ready for our adventure in Jerome. Did I mention it was a ghost town? I have a bit of an obsession with ghosts. I am believer, and a belieber. Hahaha. Ok, seriously. Let’s find some ghosts.

First stop was the Jerome State Historic Park. The Historic Park is located in the Douglas Mansion and boasts tons of artifacts and history of the town. Don’t miss the 20 minute video, which takes you through the history and development of Jerome – funny ghost narrator dude too.

Speaking of ghosts, when I checked my phone later I had 144 blast photos while I was in the Mansion. This blast photo thing happened on a ghost tour in New Orleans too. Kinda weird, right?

The outside of the mansion is gorgeous with lots of mining parts scattered around the area.

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I thought this model of the town with the mining shafts, faults, etc was pretty cool.

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Next to the Historic Park is the Audrey Mine Shaft. It is inoperable now but you can go check it out and even stand over the void of the 1,900 ft shaft!! No worries guys, there is a thick plate of glass and a metal crate to keep you from falling in. Thank goodness!

The Audrey was the center unit of the main United Verde Extension mine shaft. It was concrete-lined for fire prevention and was state-of-art for its day. The Audrey (I love how they call their mines THE Audrey, THE Edith … can there be THE Kim?) was the main ore hauling shaft. During the prime of its time, it would haul one up to the 1,100 ft level, the ore would then be dumped into a chute cut into the rock where the ore was loaded at the 1,300 ft level into carts which were pulled through a tunnel by an electronically driven engine for transport to the Clemenceau smelter in Cottonwood, AZ.

It’s truly fascinating what they did back in the day. Here is the Audrey.

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And just to give you an idea just how deep 1900 ft is!

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Isn’t she a beaut??

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After the Historic Park where a ghost took over my phone for a bit, and I stood over a 1,900 ft shaft, we moved onto the main drag of Jerome. It isn’t too hard to find, just keep heading up and when you hit all the art galleries, a few restaurants and a few hotels; you are there. Now it’s REALLY time to find some ghosts.

First stop is the Jerome Grand Hotel. This hotel on Cleopatra Hill used to be the United Verde Hospital opened in 1927 where sick and injured miners were treated. The hospital closed in 1950 and sat vacant for 46 years. The building had a reputation for being haunted with ghostly sounds of moaning and coughing. Plus a man named Claude Harvey was killed when he was caught under the elevator in 1935. Super scary.

At the Jerome Grand Hotel keep a lookout for a bearded man who wanders the halls, a young boy who likes to run around on the third floor, sounds and lights around the elevator thanks to Harvey and supposedly the hotel lobby is a place the spirits like to hang around and play tricks. Alas, we had a drink in the upstairs bar but did not see any strange people or occurrences. Great views from up there though!

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Next, we parked by all the shops and wandered around. It was Saturday evening and it was Art Night! Sweet, they had free drinks and snacks at every art gallery. And there are plenty of them: lots of great paintings, jewelry and a few oddities.

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You can stop by Mile High Inn which became home of one of the most famous ladies of the night during the 1900s. She was Madam Jennie Banters (reportedly one of the richest women in northern Arizona) and the inn became her popular bordello; Jennie and her ladies entertained many men during the mining boom in Jerome. She can be seen upstairs usually in the “Lariat and Lace” room. But there is also the phantom cat where guests stoop to pet the cat but then it suddenly vanishes. We stopped by the Mile High Grill (the restaurant below the inn) where I inquired about the cat. I was looked at like I had three heads and then I explained, “you know, the ghost cat”. “Ahhh, haven’t seen it in awhile but if you did it would be upstairs and not here,” she answered. Boo hoo and one isn’t allowed at the inn unless you have a hotel reservation.

We moved on.

In between more art galleries – more glasses of champagne and crackers with slices of cheese and pretzels and sometimes a little sandwich and one time shrimp with cocktail sauce; we walked around the tiny downtown and then ran into another of Jerome’s haunted places, the Connor Hotel. Rumor has it, the spirits come and go here.

But the rooms are haunted. Room 1 is said to be haunted by a lady in red and her friends. You may hear women whispering and laughing or she possibly comes to see you in your dreams. Scary! In room 5 people say they feel cold spots and the appliances like to go off by themselves. Reminds me of my freshmen year dorm room, my clock could “talk” and one time just went off and told us the time without us pushing the button. THAT dorm was defo haunted!

That’s it y’all. Jerome was so much fun even if I never experienced a ghost encounter. I’ll leave you with my pic of the Connor Hotel. Do you see anything strange in the windows??  OOOoooooooooOOOOOO

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arizona · cool photos · flying · travel · usa

Night Lights

I may or may not be over my jet lag.

What a whirlwind of fun from my recent travels to New Orleans and Arizona. Mostly it was to check in on my mom, who is recovering from a double mastectomy and starting radiation but also quite a lot of fun was had with Jeannie and my parents. Naturally.

Coming soon lots more information than you probably want on the exciting times of NOLA and AZ. Til then, enjoying this cool pic of coming into Phoenix, AZ at night. I really love this picture.

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arizona · hotels · paaaarty · travel · usa

W Hotel Scottsdale

 It’s hot in Surprise, AZ. Like, blazing hot. 115F to be exact.

A few trips to the community pool with my family was nice. But after kids splashing me, an older lady complaining to me that they closed half of the pool to swim camp and teenagers making out that looked 13 it was nice to make a change. Time for the pool at the W Hotel in Scottsdale.

Lemme tell you. It was nice. No, wait, more than that. It was NICE. Kids and splashes were replaced with lounge chairs and pool side service. And did I mention that we weren’t even staying at the hotel? Well, not that night at least. The first day was a Friday, we had no problem getting into the pool area and immediately ordering shrimp ceviche and Dos Equis. Here is what the pool looked like on Friday.

Aannnnnnddd here is what it looked like on Saturday.

A completely different world! We were hotel guests for that evening, otherwise we would have never made it to this scene. The weekends at the W are happening. Drinks were flowing, the DJ was spinnin’ and the people were crazy, yo! The girlies had an outift for walking to their cabana, then another outfit for lounging in the cabana, and then a bikini for the pool. The hair was piled, the makeup was layered and the game was on. I was none of that and I do believe I heard a collective gasp when I actually went under the water to cool off.

What more could two hot girls want? And I meant hot, in both senses.

I do love the W Hotels. They are always modern with a comfortable feel. A flat screen tv, bath products from Bliss and an excellent Sushi restaurant is what we encountered at this one.  We loved it so much we came back to the pool on Monday and enjoyed it one more time. Great time to beat the heat and relax in a hip (but sometimes loud) atmosphere. Go try it out for yourself!

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arizona · beauty · earth · familia · hike · Road Trip · travel · usa

Final Stop: Arches and Powell

Final stop – Arches National Park and Lake Powell. We didn’t do both in one day, but they go hand in hand. Lots of rocks and arches and fun!

Arches National Park in located in Moab, Utah. It contains the world’s largest concentration of natural stone arches. This National Park is a red, arid desert, punctuated with oddly eroded sandstone forms such as fins, pinnacles, spires, balanced rocks, and arches. The 73,000-acre region has over 2,000 of these “miracles of nature.”

We pretty much stayed in the car and drove the loop, it took about 2.5 hours. But there are trails to hike, a campground to stay at, you can easily stay a full day or more. My two favorites were balanced rock and the three gossips.

I heard she went out with Jacob last night. I knew she would cheat on Edward.

Careful now, concentrate, balance. Ooooommmmmm….

Lake Powell is next! Lake Powell is a reservoir on the Colorado River, straddling the border between Utah and Arizona (most of it, along with Rainbow Bridge, is in Utah). It is the second largest man-made reservoir in the United States.

We opted for the Rainbow Bridge Tour. Enjoy cruising past 50 miles of Lake Powell to Rainbow Bridge National Monument.  At the monument, the tour boat docks and you will set off a fairly easy mile-plus trail to Rainbow Bridge.  The bridge itself extends 290′ into the sky and 275′ across Bridge Canyon.  Witness first hand the power of wind and water in their role of sculpting this remarkable landscape.

To catch the boat tours you must go to the Wahweap Marina, near Page, AZ. The cruise lasted about five hours total, you get a headset to hear about Lake Powell plus free lemonade and water! The boat has a seating area upstairs, or if you want some shelter from the sun (or the rain) there is also seating below. My parents and I had a nice time cruising the lake, checking out the sandstone and watching all the houseboats and waverunners pass us by. Here are some of my favs from the tour.

Rainbow Bridge was truly spectacular. Even better, I got to enjoy it with Mom and Dad.

architecture · arizona · earth · familia · Road Trip · travel · usa

Trippin with the Rents.

My parents have finally settled down in Phoenix, AZ. Finally! They were nomads for a couple of years and it seriously drove me batty. I guess in my old age I am just concerned about them in their old age (kidding mom, you’re not old, only dad). I know Mom was enjoying the nomad life, but not so sure about Dad. But now, with their son, daughter-in-law, grandson in the very same town, everyone can be happy. I think. Every time I am back in the states I seem to end up on a road trip with my parents. Like here or the European one here! And I seriously love trippin’ with Dot and Chuck. Maybe when my nephew and nephew-to-arrive-in-DECEMBER (!!!) are a bit older we can add my brother’s family along. That would require a little larger method of transportation, like the Winnebago my grandparents owned. It was the coolest ride ever.

At first, we were going to head down to Puerto Penasco, Mexico. Even with all the problems between Arizona and Mexico we were still going to go, after all it is only a mere three-hour drive! But then, a few days before we were going to leave a murder occurred in Puerto Penasco and we decided that maybe now is not the best time to go. Change of direction, lets head north-ish. And we were off with no real plans.

From Phoenix we headed up to Flagstaff and then over on 40E to New Mexico. Once we hit Gallup we went north on 491 up to Shiprock, because my dad likes to read the Tony Hillerman books and they are based around Shiprock. After we left Gallup and until a the day we drove back to Phoenix, my cell phone (the cool GO PHONE, everyone should get one. yes, i am being sarcastic) was never too reliable.

We drove up to Colorado and stopped at Durango for the night. Cute town! It was very touristy with lots of stores with souvenirs, jewelry and art. Plus the train is there to take you up to Silverton. In the morning we headed over to Mesa Verde National Park. Mesa Verde, Spanish for green table, offers a spectacular look into the lives of the Ancestral Pueblo people who made it their home for over 700 years, from A.D. 600 to A.D. 1300. Today, the park protects over 4,000 known archeological sites, including 600 cliff dwellings.

We bought tickets to see the Cliff Palace but we had a few hours before it was time for our tour so we drove around and stopped at many of the archeological sites to see. First one was the Pithouse.

 

That’s my cute mom walking around the Pithouse in her favorite Skechers Shape Ups.

The cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde are some of the most notable and best preserved in the North American Continent. Sometime during the late 1190s, after primarily living on the mesa top for 600 years, many Ancestral Puebloans began living in pueblos they built beneath the overhanging cliffs. The structures ranged in size from one-room storage units to villages of more than 150 rooms. While still farming the mesa tops, they continued to reside in the alcoves, repairing, remodeling, and constructing new rooms for nearly a century. By the late 1270s, the population began migrating south into present-day New Mexico and Arizona. By 1300, the Ancestral Puebloan occupation of Mesa Verde ended.

Check out some of these cliff dwellings that the Ancestral Puebloans would climb down to with specially marked footholds. Truly amazing.

How in the world did they climb DOWN to that?

Here is a lovely pic of my Dad eating an apple….

Hehe. Okay, seriously. It was time for the Cliff Palace tour! There are three tours you can go on; The Cliff Palace, The Balcony House and The Long House. The latter two are the most strenuous with tall ladders to climb and small holes to crawl through. As I mentioned earlier, my apple eating Dad is old (love you dad! now go take your medication) so the Cliff Palace was the only one he could really do.

But he wasn’t tooooo terribly old to do this one. Cliff Palace is the largest cliff dwelling in the park. A Cliff Palace tour descends approximately 100 feet into the canyon on a steep trail that includes 120 uneven stone steps. During the tour, visitors climb five, eight-foot ladders.

Recent studies reveal that Cliff Palace contained 150 rooms and 23 kivas and had a population of approximately 100 people. Out of the nearly 600 cliff dwellings concentrated within the boundaries of the park, 75% contain only 1-5 rooms each, and many are single room storage units. If you visit Cliff Palace you will enter an exceptionally large dwelling which may have had special significance to the original occupants. It is thought that Cliff Palace was a social, administrative site with high ceremonial usage. Here it is …..

Pretty cool my friends. But come back soon, this is just the first part of trippin’ with the rents. So much more to come. See you soon!

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